This is My Stock Trading Journey

stock trading basics

All of the posts under the "stock trading basics" tag.

Q&A with Marcel

And now presenting to you the next installment in our trader interview series…meet Marcel.

Q: How long have you been trading?
A: I have been trading since September 2013

Q: How many trades do you think you average per month or year?
A: On average I would say 1-3 trades a month.

Q: Why did you decide to start stock trading?
A: I had always been interested in the stock market, and wanted to learn how to invest. Initially I did not know the difference between an investor or trader, but now have come to understand that when I am trading my money is in the market for less time than the typical investor.

Q: Have you been to any NVOWS seminars?  If so, which ones and what were your thoughts on them?
A: Yes I have attended Seminar 1 ( Knowledge is better than Gold) about 3 times. In this seminar I learned a tremendous amount about the market, how it works and how I can use this vehicle to create wealth for my family and future generations.  I have also attended Seminar 2 , and learned the wonderful world of options!

Q: Is stock trading what you expected?

A: I honestly had no idea what to expect.  I regularly heard things about trading and when hearing the opinion of the typical buy and hold strategists a fear of trading was created, as they made it seem that smart investors buy and hold and typically likened trading to glorified gambling.

Q: Is there anything you know now that you wish you had known when you started?
A: No. If anything I wish I could have learned about trading sooner in life. I wasted so much money on things I don’t even own anymore. It would have been great to take that money and put it towards something useful, like my future business. Once a person learns something it is soooo easy to then go and find the same information and say “Hey I could have learned this sooner” but, I have a saying that goes “You don’t know, what you don’t know, until you learn what you don’t know”. In essence NOW that I have learned a strategy I can easily go find sources that simulate, and talk about this strategy, and NOW I have the luxury of saying “oh I could have learned this without spending X amount of money to know what I know now”, but the reality of the situation is if I did not learn what I learned in Seminar 1 , I would have no clue what to look for. Who knows maybe one day I would have discovered this wonderful strategy, but in the information age where there is a plethora of bad information mixed in with a finite amount of good, who knows how long it would have taken. I am writing this in May of 2014. I took my first seminar 1 in March of 2013, there is no way I would have half of the information I do now had I not attended seminar 1 with NVOWS.

Q:Are you consistently profitable?

A: I am pretty much even for the year.

Q: Would you recommend someone join Top Gun?  Why or why not?

A: Yes. I invested in my family business, and any child that I have from now on will also be able to participate in our business. I am leaving a legacy behind that will change my family for the better. The information I have received is invaluable, and it was worth the money I put in to get it. Every year thousands of high school graduates enroll in their first semester of college. For the price of that first year’s tuition at a university, I have gotten a much more valuable education in my opinion.

Q: Besides NVOWS materials what other resources (books, websites, people, etc) do you use?

A: First and foremost, I am getting in the habit of praying and asking Jesus for guidance before making any decision. I have endeavored to learn market tone on my own so, I read Reuters and MarketWatch to get a feel for the market tone, and compare my discoveries with NVOWS market alerts. I also bounce ideas off of my brother who is also a Top Gun. I do trust NVOWS, but I want to fly my own  plane.

Q: Anything else you’d want to add.
A: If you are thinking about taking Seminar 1 with NVOWS… Just go!  99.00 bought me a new opportunity. It bought me hope for dreams that I thought were unattainable.  IF you are anything like me, I am sure you can make a list of worse things or less valuable things you have bought that cost equal to or more than 99.00.  Take a chance, what do you have to lose?

Trader September 23, 2015 2 Comments Permalink

Q & A With An Actual Trader- Kevin

This is the big day!  For over a year I’ve been working on a special feature for my blog where ordinary everyday people turned traders would answer a few questions.  I hope this feature will help guide many as they decide if trading is for them and who they should learn trading from.  I also think many traders will benefit from learning how other traders are doing and what is or isn’t working for them.  Each week I will highlight one trader until I have no responses left.  If you would like to be one of my ‘ordinary everyday’ featured traders please shoot me an email.

So without further adieu…meet Kevin.  He should really be one of those people in my People You Meet Along the Journey post because he is definitely one I would not have met had I not started trading.  We met through my blog and he’s been my closest ‘trading friend’ since.  We’ve been bouncing trades, stock market theories and life off one another for years now.  Two weeks ago my family was fortunate to meet his beautiful wife and family as we passed through his neck of the woods for a wedding.  They were gracious to open their home, table and lives with us as we talked well into the night. (At least it felt that way since we all have very little ones.)  Okay okay enough with the rambling, here is a little Q & A with trader Kevin.

Q: How long have you been trading?
A: On and off for over 2 years.
Q: How many trades do you think you average per month or year?
A: When i am actively trading, I average about 5-10 trades a month.
Q: Why did you decide to start stock trading?
A: I was initially drawn in by radio ads from David Mitchel, and attended a 2 day seminar and enjoyed it a lot. But long before that, I believed (and still do) that the stock market is one of the few remaining level playing fields where anybody, regardless of background can make money with the right skills.
Q: Have you been to any NVOWS seminars?  If so, which ones and what were
your thoughts on them?
A: I’ve attended seminar I twice, and seminar II three times. I enjoyed both seminars, but they tended to run much longer than needed. I think both could have been condensed into a 1 day seminar by omitting much of the up selling on their other seminars and products. The information from seminar I lays the foundation on knowing when to be in the markets and provides a basic strategy for market timing, and seminar II teaches options buying strategies using the same chart patterns taught in seminar I. The seminar speakers are knowledgeable and entertaining, but their presentations are basically derived from slides made by David Mitchel. Sometimes the information on the slides begs a question that goes un-asked, and I found that sometimes the best bits of information gleaned from attending the seminars came from privately asking the speaker during a break rather than during the actual presentation.
Q: Is stock trading what you expected?
A: Heck no. I never expected the emotional roller coaster it would turn out to be for me. I never expected it would be so tempting to not follow basic rules.
Q: What strategy do you prefer? (i.e. spreads, stocks, options, etc)
A: I prefer buying options, long calls and puts. Spreads come in at 2nd.
Q: Is there anything you know now that you wish you had known when you
first started?
A: Can the answer be “everything”? In all seriousness, if i had to give myself advice 2 years ago, i would say to stick to the basics, all of the fancy strategies you are tempted to try out are a dead end. Timing is everything and getting the stock direction right is only half the battle. Buy options with plenty of time till expiration to give your position time to work itself out. Don’t get greedy and take profits when you still have a chance. Don’t try to shadow the trades of a day trader who makes millions unless you are actually approved to day trade in your account. (I was dumb enough to try this).
Q: Are you consistently profitable?
A:Not at all. I’m consistently unprofitable. I’ve made thousands and lost thousands, but i’ve definitely lost more than i’ve made. Every loss is a lesson, and sadly i think learning the hard way seems to be the only way i’ll learn. On the bright side, I think i’m on my way to actually learning to not do dumb things.
Q: Would you recommend someone join Top Gun?  Why or why not?
A: This is a tough question, because I want to say yes! absolutely join top gun! The information taught is good and solid and has the potential to earn you much more than you paid in tuition, but now that i’ve been around the block so to speak, I am a little hesitant to recommend. Why? Because the information is readily available for free elsewhere. The tricky part is knowing what information to seek out online. Listening to the wrong person can be very costly, which I know from experience. I am tempted to tell just a few key words you can google to find all the information you’d ever want, but maybe that’s not fair. You’ll just have to sign up for top gun. 🙂
Q: Besides NVOWS materials what other resources (books, websites, people, etc) do you use?
A: In no particular order: 1option.com has a daily market analysis that is helpful. Even more helpful is his “options strategies” and “option Q & A” sections which are a goldmine of information. I also visit https://tradinglicks.wordpress.com/ which has a unique perspective on the market. The blog author invented a market timing indicator using volume alone and i think it can be a valuable tool to see which direction the big money is pointing towards. I also sometimes i listen to the market recaps from Brian Shannon, a certified market technician at http://alphatrends.tumblr.com/. He has some enlightening blog entries as well. I’m also reading a book by Richard Wyckoff, one of the pioneers of technical analysis – the guy who coined the terms “support and resistance”. Much of his book is in harmony with NVOWS/David Mitchel, but his ideas on volume analysis are different (and better). The book is called “The Richard Wyckoff Method Of Trading and Investing in Stocks”
Anything else you’d want to add.
A: There is a reason most people lose money in the markets. It is hard! Don’t beat yourself up if you’re one of the 85% of market participants not making money. Keep at it, keep learning (from good sources teaching sound principles) and dont give up. A person who takes risks with his/her money is wiser than the person who sits on it, even if the risk does not end with reward. Money will come and go, but the experience and knowledge gained from participating in the stock market cannot be replaced. Many people after years of hard work and determination finally have their light bulb moment and began consistently making money, but prior risk and failure is almost surely a part of that path for most.

 

Trader August 13, 2015 Leave A Comment Permalink

Pre-Trading Couseling-What I Wish I Had Known When I First Started Trading

Before I got married my husband and I sat through weeks of pre-marital counseling with our Pastor and weeks more in a class setting. We learned so much and it helped get our marriage off to a great start.  As I celebrate my 3 year trading anniversary and think back to when I started perhaps that would have been helpful before I started trading. You know, Pre-Trading Counseling. Someone to sit down with me 1 on 1 and say,

“This isn’t always going to be easy.”

“This is going to take a lot of hard work.”

“This will stretch you and make you uncomfortable at times.”

“This will make you grow and refine you.”

“There will be times when you will second guess yourself and wonder if you have what it takes.”

Well I’ve put together just 4 of the things I wish someone had told me when I started trading and perhaps they can be helpful to someone else who is starting out particularly if trading with Neuventure on Wall Street.

  1. 300% returns are not the norm. Yes, that is what is used in the seminar examples giving me dollar signs in my eyes and thinking I’m going to always get the perfect buy and sell point. Doesn’t work that way. 300% returns come along but they are NOT the norm.
  2. It’s okay to get trading information from a variety of sources besides just NVOWS. At fist I was told I would just get more confused if I learned trading from anyone/anywhere else. This closed me off for maybe over a year of learning from outside sources and to be honest I just didn’t get enough information from only NVOWS to make me a great trader because I couldn’t afford all their programs that make up a well-rounded trader. I mean, I didn’t even learn historic horizontal lines from them and we all know those are a really big deal. It’s simply okay and even important to take advantage of some of the great information available through books, websites (here are some of my go to websites)  and other traders.
  3. Being an NVOWS “Insider” is not an excuse to casually look at the market and not do much while waiting for Market Alerts and Stock Calendar updates. For more time than I would like to admit I was extremely passive and would hardly glance at the markets until I got a Market Alert telling me it’s time to trade and here are some stocks to look at. Well by the time I looked into all of them they were past good buy points and I had missed the move…again. This is such an important lesson to learn early on. You must do the work yourself. Look through charts everyday. Set price alerts on stocks nearing good buy points. Check earnings. Be ready with stocks so when the market lines up you are ready to pull the trigger quickly.
  4. And the number 1 thing I wish I had known when I started is that trading is a ton of work.  I got the impression at my first seminars that trading was simple, anyone could do it and I could easily make a bunch of money. NOT THE CASE! It is hard work and involves sacrifice.  Sacrifice of free time is the main one. Instead of reading a nice recreational feel good novel or watching TV, evenings after the kids go to bed are spent pouring through charts, past trades and continuing to learn how to become a better trader.

Had I known some of these tidbits I could have probably learned more quickly and saved myself some disappointment. Other tools you can use are my questions to ask yourself when considering trading and my top 10 things to know before attending Seminar 1.  I know my pre marital counseling helped me learn some realistic expectations of marriage, my spouse and the effort it would take to have a wonderful marriage. So there was my attempt at a little Pre-Trading Counseling.

How ‘bout you?

What do you know now that you didn’t know then? Or what would you tell someone at Pre-Trading Counseling?

Trader August 15, 2014 19 Comments Permalink

So Many Types of Traders

As some of you may already know, I was totally new to trading when I started.  I had very limited knowledge before setting out on my stock trading journey.  My first exposure was at a trading seminar where I learned the basics of swing trading.  Did I know at the time that what I had just learned was swing trading?  No.  Not a chance.  In fact I thought I had learned something that was just so incredible.  Something the average person would have no way of knowing unless they took this amazing seminar.  I had entered a top-secret group of people who knew something about the stock market that no one else had figured out yet.  Well the euphoria came to a screeching halt after that seminar as I began to learn more about trading via the internet.  I found out I had learned perhaps the most common and basic way to trade stocks.  I also learned there are many other ways to trade and most traders fall into one of several general approaches or ‘camps’ if you will.

So I thought I would put together a little post outlining some of the common types.  I’ll start by saying I am just addressing types of equity traders.  Equity traders are those who trade stocks through one of the major exchanges like the New York Stock Exchange or London Stock exchange etc.

  • Day traders are those who buy and sell the stock (or currency, futures, etc) in the same day or they may even buy and sell the same stock multiple times in a day holding it anywhere from seconds to occasionally hours.  They usually close all positions by the close of the market to avoid any surprise gaps the next morning.  This is a very time-consuming way to trade that is usually reserved for full-time traders.
  • Swing traders follow the direction of the market as a whole when buying and selling stocks.  They use a combination of fundamental analysis, technical analysis and market tone.  Traders usually hold their positions anywhere from days, weeks or months depending on market momentum.
  • Fundamental traders use fundamental analysis and spend much time researching companies.  They pay close attention to such things as earning reports, company announcements, stock splits, financial results, etc.  This is often a more long-term buy and hold strategy but other short-term strategies use it as well.
  • Buy and hold, long-term or investment traders are those who buy stocks and hold them for an extended period of time, months or even years.  They are not so much concerned with the day-to-day price action of the stocks but are hoping for a return over the long run.
  • Momentum traders are those who look for stocks that are making big moves up or down usually on higher volume and jump in hoping to ride that momentum.  These traders are mostly trading stocks that are in the news because those are the ones experiencing some sort of big move.  It is a more advanced strategy.  You can find out more here. http://www.stock-options-made-easy.com/momentum-traders.html
  • Technical traders focus solely on charts.  They often care little about what stock they are actually trading and believe that the most important thing driving stocks is the supply and demand.  They focus on patterns, moving averages, primary and secondary indicators, etc.
  • Scalping is a short-term strategy where one makes many trades each day.  Sometimes even in the hundreds exploiting the bid ask spread and therefore hoping to make small profits from each trade.

This list is hardly exhaustive but it does give you a general idea of some of the more common ways people choose to trade stocks.  Any of the types can be googled to find a wealth of information.

How ’bout you?  Do you fall into one of these ‘camps?’

It All Comes Down to This

The Stock Market.  THE STOCK MARKET.  It’s big that’s why I wrote it in all caps.  What I mean by big is there is so much to learn and know and just when you think you’ve started to wrap your mind around it, it can change. There are stocks, options, ETFs, spreads, bulls, bears, retracements, laggards, head and shoulders, sectors, ratios, candlesticks, supply, demand, indices, futures, ‘the fed’, earnings, gaps, stochastics, bases, volume, support, macd, moving averages, corrections, blue chips…I’m running out of breath. You get the idea and I could go on and on for pages and could spend a great amount of time learning the details of each that I just listed.  If I read one book each day from Amazons’ “stock trading” book results page it would take me 44 years to read all 16,322 stock trading books.  Do you see what I’m saying?  The stock market is a huge ocean of information and it’s easy to drown in it!

So what does it all come down to?  I’m glad you asked.  I believe it all comes down to this.

Where is support?  Where is resistance?  What is the market doing?

The. Best. Place. To. Start. Period.

Get great at drawing those lines and finding the right support and resistance but then not stopping there.  Taking it a step further and paying close attention to what the market as a whole is doing.  It’s a lot easier to trade a short position when the market is perfectly poised for a retracement and negative news is making the headlines or a long position when the S&P has just bounced off support and the news in general is cheery and positive.  It’s much more challenging to go against the market…against the tide so to speak.

So that’s it.  That’s what is all comes down to.  With such an amazing amount of information about stock trading in books, the internet, magazines, seminars, movies and television it can be tempting to try to learn it all and while there is benefit to learning much, I would like to suggest that there may be a more profitable benefit to first learning and perfecting the basics.  Here is a link to a great crash course in support and resistance. http://stockcharts.com/help/doku.php?id=chart_school:chart_analysis:support_and_resistan

So, how ‘bout you?  What do you think it all comes down to?

Trader March 5, 2014 3 Comments Permalink

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